Ethiopia Economy

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Entries Tagged as 'Ethiopian Economy'

Bushland and shrubland

11,133 Comments · Ethiopian Economy

These account for about 21.4% of the area of the country and occupy the intermediate zone between the humid and semi-arid parts of the country.

They are often intermixed with the woodland and the moderately cultivated land regions. Pastoral livestock grazing and browsing and, in some parts, charcoal and incense harvesting are the main activities.

The more dense bushland occurs on the humid side of the region and consists of multi-storied bushes. In the west, lowland bamboo bushland of pure stands of Oxytenanthera abyssinica is common.

The shrubland occurs on the semi-arid side and often consists of patches of shrubs interspersing grasslands with some scattered low trees.

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The postal service

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The need for fast and easy but effective ways of correspondence at various stages of social development triggered the appearance of the existing multiple forms of communication.

The postal service is one of the means of communication that offers significant assistance to development. One of the areas where the postal service plays an important role is in the promotion of domestic and international trade relations.

In fact, before the advent of telex and telephone connections, postal activity was the only effective way that bridged trade and diplomatic relations between nations.

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Historical development of transport

478 Comments · Ethiopian Economy

This text is designed to give the reader some idea of the growth and development of transport in Ethiopia.

For convenience, the treatment is based on the ancient, medieval and nineteenth century historical periods of Ethiopia; and the accompanying map indicates developments in the more recent periods since 1820 E.C (1828.)

During the Axumite period, Ethiopia was a mighty and prosperous state in North-East Africa. A network of caravan trade routes used to connect its interior with its ports of Adulis, Mitsiwa and Zula. Its fleets dominated the Red Sea.

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